About the books





Who are these books for?

Why use film?

The films


The scenes


The tasks


The themes

The DVDs
and copyright issues


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Who are these books for?


Teaching with Film and Teaching with Film 2 are for teachers of English as a foreign language working in higher education, schools or language schools with intermediate students and upwards and using communicative language teaching methods.


If you're looking to start, finish or break up a lesson with something visual, something to motivate and interest your students, something to introduce a subject you are working on, something to create a good atmosphere for learning, something with a bit of magic: then that something is film.


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Why use film?

 

Films are funny, moving, thought-provoking.


Films
sum up a problem in a few minutes of well-written script, dilemmas we face in everyday life are illustrated in an entertaining way.


In teaching English as a foreign language they help trigger discussions, set up writing tasks and can be used to practise listening skills, learn vocabulary or get students used to hearing how native speakers "really" communicate.


Films highlight
communication and business skills, give students a glimpse into the target culture adding colour and life to their studies. And films motivate.


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The films


The two books include a total of over 300 film scenes from 187 English-language movies of recent decades (volume 1: 175 scenes from 100 movies / volume 2: 150 scenes from 87 movies).


The films are listed alphabetically by title with the themes listed in the index.


Each film
includes key information (writer, director, actors, genre, year).


Although the film selection is restricted to English-language films a variety of genres and a mix of female and male characters in independent and mainstream British and Hollywood films have been included.


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The scenes

 

The scenes range from 25 minutes with a few being up to 10 minutes when warranted. (See a sample page from the original book).


Each scene has been carefully chosen, researched and categorised under themes.


A short introductory text puts the scene into the context of the film.


DVD timings are given, some scenes come with an option of longer or shorter versions.


When possible scenes contain a complete sequence with a clear beginning and end.



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The tasks


The scenes come with a gist listening task, a selection of useful vocabulary and ideas for follow-up speaking, reading, writing and listening tasks. In volume 2 pre-activity tasks have been added.


Some scenes include a detailed listening
task, an A4 handout (with key) which can be downloaded from the downloads page.


The structured writing
tasks are taken from the Cambridge exams and include such formats as articles, letters, competition entries, information sheets, proposals, reports, reviews and short stories.


Business skills can also be illustrated and practised with scenes showing job interviews, presentations, meetings, negotiations, small talk,
problem solving, intercultural communication, teamwork and other areas of business.


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The themes

 


Themes of the scenes include: advertising, arguments, being creative, business, celebrity, childhood, communication problems, conflict resolution, crime, cultural differences, democracy, discussing problems, dreams, ethics, expressing feelings, families, finding your vocation in life, friendship, the future, getting a job, getting to know someone, giving instructions, global problems, helping others, hobbies, homes, intercultural communication, introducing a family, job interviews, learning, life, losing a job, making a decision, making a mistake, media, meetings, meeting someone famous, men-women, music, negotiations, overcoming loss, parents, plane journeys, politics, presentations, privacy, problem solving, small talk, speeches, sport, storytelling, succeeding, taking a risk, teaching, technology, teenagers, television, travel, writing, and many more…


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The DVDs


Today's widespread availability of DVDs makes accessibility easier than in the past.


Educational establishments often have their own DVD libraries, DVDs can be borrowed from public libraries or are available from rental chains and online download services.


When all these avenues have been exhausted (including film enthusiasts among your friends, family and colleagues), DVDs are available at very reasonable prices.


Movieclips (Official clips online)
The website Movieclips (now incorporated into YouTube) offers an extensive selection of licensed, high quality film clips and is backed by six major Hollywood studios (not Disney).


Some of the scenes used in Teaching with Film can therefore be accessed online.


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Copyright issues

 

Using film clips for educational purposes is allowed by copyright law in the UK, US, Germany and Austria.


As long as the DVD has been purchased legally, and the clip is embedded in an educational framework, its use for educational purposes does not contravene copyright law.


Please check copyright laws in your country.


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Film in education

 
"As communication through moving images plays an unprecedented role in our era, the education system needs to acknowledge this fact: teaching film, as well as teaching and learning with film, should be a basic requirement at any school, university or kindergarten."

Alexander Horwath
Former director of the Film Museum, Vienna